STOPPT DIE PIRATERIE JETZT UNTERSTÜTZT SEELEUTE UND UNTERSCHREIBT DIE PETITION! DIE REGIERUNGEN MÜSSEN JETZT HANDELN, UM PIRATERIE ZU BEKÄMPFEN! GENUG IST GENUG!

Hoffnung für die Schifffahrt

"Piratenkönig" geht in den Ruhestand

http://www.somaliareport.com/index.php/topic/35 Montag, 14. Januar 2013 Somalias "Piratenkönig" Mohamed Abdi Hassan und seine gesamte Seeräuberbande wollen ihre kriminelle Arbeit an den Nagel hängen. "Mein Vater hat erklärt, dass er nicht weiter kommerzielle Schiffe entführen wird", sagte sein Sohn Abdulkadir der Nachrichtenagentur dpa. Acht Jahre lang habe die von seinem Vater gegründete Truppe im Zentrum des Krisenlandes den "tödlichen Piratenjob" ausgeführt, fügte er hinzu. Der unter dem Namen "Afwayne" bekannte "Piratenkönig" hatte in der vergangenen Woche gegenüber Medienvertretern erklärt, alle ausländischen Schiffe könnten nun ungehindert in den Gewässern seines Gebietes fahren. "Aber wir rufen die Regierung dazu auf, Arbeitsplätze für die Jugendlichen zu schaffen, die davon träumen, Piraten zu werden." Nach dpa-Informationen sollen mehrere Dorfälteste sowie Geschäftsleute und Verwaltungschefs der Region die Piraten von dem Schritt überzeugt haben. Die Gewässer vor der Küste Somalias sind seit Jahren für Piratenattacken berüchtigt. Insgesamt ist die Zahl der Angriffe im Golf von Aden und im Indischen Ozean aber rückläufig. Mehr als 120 Menschen werden aber noch immer als Geiseln gehalten. dpa/FBi http://gcaptain.com/pirate-kingpin-kidding-retirement/

Pirate Kingpin’s Retirement Announcement Press Conference [VIDEO]

By On
Is this guy kidding me with this press conference? Earlier this week we posted about a pirate “Kingpin” named Mohamed Abdi Hassan, aka ‘Afweyne’ (translated ‘Big Mouth’), who announced his official retirement from the Somali piracy business during a recent press conference held in Somalia. Anyway, when I heard that he held a press conference, for some reason I wasn’t picturing a literal press conference with respected members of the media. How do you even get invited to one of these things? Here’s the video: http://verkehr.verdi.de/schifffahrt/piraterie STOPPT DIE PIRATERIE JETZT UNTERSTÜTZT SEELEUTE UND UNTERSCHREIBT DIE PETITION! DIE REGIERUNGEN MÜSSEN JETZT HANDELN, UM PIRATERIE ZU BEKÄMPFEN! GENUG IST GENUG! • Fast täglich werden Seeleute gekidnappt und sind somit einem wachsenden Verletzungsrisiko oder Lebensgefahr ausgesetzt • Täglich transportieren Seeleute Güter in Gegenden, wo das Risiko, von Piraten angegriffen zu werden steigt • Täglich erdulden die Familien der Seeleute Sorge und Ungewissheit • Täglich verringern sich die Chancen, potentielle Seeleute für die Seefahrt zu gewinnen Dabei sind unsere Volkswirtschaften auf sie angewiesen • Täglich müssen Reedereien und Versicherer mehr Geld für Schutzmaβnahmen gegen Piraterie, zusätzlichen Treibstoff und Lösegelder aufbringen- Kosten, die letztendlich auf den Endverbraucher umgelegt werden • Täglich steigt die Gefahr einer Umweltkatastrophe in Form einer Ölpest, die von Piraten verursacht werden kann • Täglich werden die Chancen für einen Aufschwung der Weltwirtschaft durch diese Bedrohung des Welthandels aufs Spiel gesetzt Wir, die Unterzeichner, rufen die Regierungen dringend dazu auf, alles für sie mögliche zu unternehmen, um Tausende von Seeleuten und hunderte von Schiffen, die der Gefahr von Piraten Schifffahrt-2-2012  Verdi Ausgabe Schifffahrt WSV Reform Manila Abkommen Piraterie  

AA) Not Just Numbers: New Study Examines the Human Cost of Piracy

A) Weekly Piracy Report: What Happened to the Monsoon? LNG Carrier Takes Fire

B ) Armed Support for Vessels Transiting High Risk Maritime Areas Not a Solution (UK)

By gCaptain Staff On June 21, 2012

  By Mike Schuler On Seafarers held hostage Oceans Beyond Piracy, the same advocacy group that calculated the economic cost of piracy by the numbers, has just released its second annual installment of it’s “Human Cost of Piracy” report. The study includes a statistical analysis of the threats of violence caused by acts of piracy and was produced in conjunction with data and information from the International Maritime Bureau. For the first time, the report publishes findings based on the Declaration Condemning Acts of Violence Against Seafarers, which provides for better reporting of the treatment of hostages.  The Declaration, was initially signed in Washington in August 2011 by Liberia, the Marshall Islands, Panama, and then by the Bahamas in March 2012, and commits signatory states to submit reports to the IMB on the treatment of seafarers held hostage. “Thousands are attacked for financial gain without regard for the human cost to attain a ransom,” says Kaija Hurlburt, Project Manager with Oceans Beyond Piracy co-author of the report. “In 2011, at least 3,863 seafarers were fired upon by Somali pirates armed with assault rifles and rocket propelled grenades. While the number of hostages has gone down over the past year, the violence faced by seafarers has remained high and attacks are often carried out with a determined ferocity – even against vessels protected by private security teams.” Actually, some of the findings are downright scary, and at times encouraging, depending on how you look at it. By The Numbers   The report found that a total of 3,863 seafarers were fired upon by Somali pirates, down 8% from 2010.  Of those, 968 came in close contact with armed pirates who were able to board their vessels and a total of 413 of them were rescued from citadels by naval forces. A standout number in the report was that the number of seafarers taken hostage in 2011 dropped by 50% with a total of 555, most likely driven by increased security measures taken by crews including the use of  armed.  In 2010 a total of 1,090 had been taken hostage. The report adds that a total of at least 1,206 hostages were held captive by Somali pirates in 2011, including the 555 seafarers who fell victim during 2011, 645 who were captured in 2010 and remained captive in 2011, and 6 tourists and aid workers kidnapped on land.  The report estimates that the average length of captivity was over 8 months, up 50% over 2010. Tragically, 35 hostages died during 2011 including; 8 who were killed by pirates during an initial attack or after being taken captive; 8 died from disease or malnutrition while being held; and 19 died in crossfire while being used as human shields and during hostage rescue attempts.  Another 3 hostages died after release as a result of abuse they had suffered while in captivity. In contrast, it is estimated that 111 pirates were killed in 2011 with 78 killed as a result of encounters with naval forces, 30 killed by fellow pirates, and 3 by Puntland police. The report also shows that all of the crews were subject systematic and daily psychological and physical abuse.  In some cases, the report finds, crews were even being used as human shields. A former hostage tells us: “One day pirates drew us out to the open deck, told us to turn back and stand still facing the sea side. Then we heard how they reloaded their machine guns. We understood nothing. We saw US Navy not far out and we were standing and waiting for about two hours . . .” The International Maritime Bureau (IMB) notes in the report the experiences of the seafarers from 23 of the 77 vessels hijacked in 2010 and 2011 based on reports submitted by the Flag States of Liberia, the Marshall Islands, Panama and the Bahamas, various ship owners and operators, former hostages, and by the Maritime Piracy Humanitarian Response Programme. “Various analyses of the Somali piracy problem have so far ignored a meaningful study into the human cost upon the seafarers and their families,” says Captain Pottengal Mukundan, Director of the IMB. “This report aims to fill this gap and highlight some of the shocking consequences of this crime upon merchant seafarers, who are in the main, silent, involuntary victims. As other initiatives to counter piracy at sea off Somalia have become established, this important area of support to the victim seafarers and their families remains unaddressed. The challenge of any report of this kind is in getting the victims to recall their painful experiences and report them to help victims in the future.” Full Report: The Human Cost of Piracy 2011

Related Articles:
  1. By the Numbers: How Much Does Somali Piracy Cost? [REPORT]
  2. The Human Tragedy of Piracy: EUNAVFOR Talks Hostages
  3. The Human Element of Piracy: New Program Launches to Aid Those Affected
  4. Flag States Look to Bring Back the Human Element of Piracy
  5. Post-Piracy Care for Seafarers – New Study
Tagged with: imbpiracysomalia report   About The Author

Mike Schuler

After graduating the Catholic University of America in 2005 with a B.S.B.A. in Finance, Mike Schuler went on to Tahoe to help with the launch of gCaptain's sister site, UnofficialNetworks.com. In June of 2008 Mike joined gCaptain.com as the first full-time employee in charge of the day-to-day operations of gCaptain.com and Unofficial Networks, LLC. Visit Authors Website →  

Human Cost of Somali Piracy Updated Report Released

Posted on Jun 26th, 2012 with tags cost, human, News by topic, piracy, released, report, Somali, Updated.   A report highlighting latest details of the plight of seafarers at the hands of Somali pirates was launched on Friday 22nd June at a press conference in London. The report, The Human Cost of Piracy 2011, is written jointly by Kaija Hurlburt of One Earth Future for its Oceans Beyond Piracy project and by the International Maritime Bureau. The joint report is an update of the first report on the Human Cost of Piracy for 2010, launched in London by Oceans Beyond Piracy in June last year. This report includes a statistical analysis of the threats of violence caused by acts of piracy as well as the first published findings collected as a result of the Declaration Condemning Acts of Violence Against Seafarers. The Declaration, signed initially in Washington in August last year by Liberia, the Marshall Islands, and Panama, and by the Bahamas in March 2012, commits signatory states to submit reports to the IMB on the treatment of seafarers held hostage. “Thousands are attacked for financial gain without regard for the human cost to attain a ransom,” says Kaija Hurlburt, Project Manager with Oceans Beyond Piracy. “In 2011, at least 3,863 seafarers were fired upon by Somali pirates armed with assault rifles and rocket propelled grenades. While the number of hostages has gone down over the past year, the violence faced by seafarers has remained high and attacks are often carried out with a determined ferocity – even against vessels protected by private security teams.” Of that number, 968 seafarers faced armed pirates who managed to board their vessels. 413 of these seafarers were rescued from citadels (secured rooms) on their vessels by naval forces after waiting, terrified, for hours or even days while pirates tried to break into the citadels. A total of at least 1,206 hostages were held captive by Somali pirates in 2011. These included 555 seafarers who were attacked and taken hostage during the year, 645 hostages captured in 2010 who remained in pirate hands during 2011, and 6 tourists and aid workers kidnapped on land. The average length of captivity has also increased by 50% over last year, up to an average length of over 8 months. Often these hostages face systematic and daily psychological and physical abuse and were even used as human shields: “One day pirates drew us out to the open deck, told us to turn back and stand still facing the sea side. Then we heard how they reloaded their machine guns. We understood nothing. We saw US Navy not far out and we were standing and waiting for about two hours . . .” (Report of released seafarer) 35 hostages died during 2011: 8 were killed by pirates during an initial attack or after being taken captive; 8 died from disease or malnutrition while being held; and 19 died in crossfire while being used as human shields and during hostage rescue attempts. The International Maritime Bureau (IMB) notes in the report the experiences of the seafarers from 23 of the 77 vessels hijacked in 2010 and 2011based on reports submitted by the Flag States of Liberia, the Marshall Islands, Panama and the Bahamas, various ship owners and operators, former hostages, and by the Maritime Piracy Humanitarian Response Programme. “Various analyses of the Somali piracy problem have so far ignored a meaningful study into the human cost upon the seafarers and their families,” says Captain Pottengal Mukundan, Director of the IMB. “This report aims to fill this gap and highlight some of the shocking consequences of this crime upon merchant seafarers, who are in the main, silent, involuntary victims. As other initiatives to counter piracy at sea off Somalia have become established, this important area of support to the victim seafarers and their families remains unaddressed. The challenge of any report of this kind is in getting the victims to recall their painful experiences and report them to help victims in the future.” The report shows that all of the captive crews were subject to treatments in violation of basic human rights and psychological abuse. At least half experienced physical abuse. In addition to those reported to have died in captivity, it says that three of the hostages died following release because of the abuse they experienced at pirate hands. According to Marcel Arsenault, Chairman of the One Earth Future Foundation and sponsor of the report, piracy is a systemic problem that proliferates from a failed state. “While the report rightfully focuses on violence faced by innocent seafarers, increased violence has also exacted a huge cost on Somali society. The desperate situation in Somalia continues to breed piracy. Piracy will ultimately be solved only by a new global initiative to create jobs and improve governance.” The Human Cost of Piracy 2011 report

 

HOA Pirate Activity, 14– 20 June

Incidents by Region: June 14-20

INDIAN OCEAN–EAST AFRICA

OMAN: Marshall Island Flagged, US owned (?), M/V LNG ARIES was attacked by a skiff with 5-6 pirates onboard on 20 June at 20:50 N – 059:30 E, 35 nm northeast of Masirah Island, Oman. The skiff had no visible ladders onboard but opened fire with machine guns at approximately 400-600 yards. The vessel also reported sighting an RPG. No casualties were reported. The vessel had no EST aboard but had a citadel onboard, razor wire and fire hoses were rigged. The vessel increased speed and separated 4 nm from the skiff before the skiff ended pursuit. The USS VICKSBURG was approximately 200 nm northeast of Masirah, Oman. M/V LNG ARIES was later confirmed safe. (IMB)

 

MOL LNG’s LNG ARIES. Photo by Jurij S. via Marinetraffic.com

OMAN: Chemical Tanker was chased on 09 June at 24:52 N – 056:38 E 12 nm east of Al Bulaydah, Oman. Pirates in four boats chased a chemical tanker underway. Two boats approached from stern and positioned itself not more than five meters from the tanker’s poop deck. The master raised alarm, took evasive maneuvers and non-essential crew mustered in the citadel. The ship’s whistle was sounded continuously and the search light was directed towards the third boat. The boat altered course and moved away. The remaining three boats passed very close to the tanker’s side without stopping. After 20 mins, two other boats approached the tanker from stern, one from port and the other from stbd. The master took counter-piracy preventive measures, directed the search light and noticed four persons in one boat and five on another boat. After 15 mins, the boats increased speed and moved away. (IMB)

GULF OF ADEN: Bulk Carrier approached on 18 June at 12:19 N – 043:57 E, Gulf of Aden. Six skiffs with 4-6 pirates in each skiff approached a bulk carrier underway at 25 knots from the starboard bow. The Master raised alarm, increased speed, altered course and sent a distress message. The skiffs attempted to approach the vessel from the starboard beam and starboard quarter and have one skiff approach from the port bow. The onboard armed security team fired eight warning flares but the pirates continued their approach. Weapons and ladders were seen in the skiff. After 40 minutes the security team fired six warning shots and the pirates aborted the approach. A naval ship arrived for assistance. (IMB)

MEDITERRANEAN–BLACK SEA

EGYPT: Bulk carrier boarded on 10 June at 31:13 N – 029:42 E, El Dekheila Anchorage, Egypt. An anchored bulk carrier was boarded by robbers via the hawse pipe by forcibly removing the secured anchor chain cover. The portside watertight door padlock was broken and the contents from the port life raft were stolen. The alarm was raised when D/O noticed that the portside watertight door was partly opened and duty A/B and boatswain investigated. After hearing the alarm, the robbers escaped in a small boat with the stolen stores. (IMB)

RED SEA

RED SEA: Tanker was approached on 12 June at 13:20 N – 042:56 E, Red Sea. A tanker underway noticed a white skiff with two outboard motors approach her at more than 25 knots. Initially two pirates were observed in the skiff and as the skiff closed five more were observed to surface from the skiff floor. As the skiff continued to approach aggressively at a distance of 200 meters from the tanker, the Master authorized the armed team to fire warning shots. After 1 hour 25 minutes, another two white skiffs with twin outboard motors doing more than 25 knots were observed approaching the tanker. The armed security team showed their weapons again and fired warning shots with rocket flares at a distance of 200 meters. In both incidents the non essential crew retreated into the citadel and a distress signal was sent requesting assistance. Surveillance aircraft were dispatched which arrived at the location. (IMB)

SOUTHEAST ASIA

INDIA: Bulk Carrier was boarded on 17 June at 17:00 N – 082:18 E, Kakinada Anchorage, India. Robbers boarded the anchored bulk carrier. The duty A/B on rounds heard two robbers talking to each other on the forecastle. He immediately informed the 2/O on the bridge who raised the alarm and sounded the ship’s whistle continuously. The duty A/B heard a motor boat moving away from the vicinity of the forecastle. On inspection, a new mooring rope was found partially hacked into small pieces on the deck. Kakinada port control was called on VHF but no response was received. The ship’s agent was informed and a security message was transmitted via VHF to warn other ships at the anchorage area. (IMB)

MALAYSIA: Robbers boarded an anchored Tug on 17 June at 01:38 N-110:28 E, Kuching Anchorage, Malaysia. Robbers boarded an anchored tug and barge. They broke open containers, stole the cargo and escaped unnoticed. The master reported the incident to the local law enforcement and authorities. The entire crew was safe. (IMB)

Piracy Weather Forecast: June 21-27

 

Pirate Skiff Capability (Graphic courtesy of the Naval Oceanographic Office Warfighting Support Center)

GULF OF ADEN: West-southwesterly winds of 10 – 15 knots, with seas of 2 – 4 feet. EXTENDED FORECAST: West-southwesterly winds of 10 – 15 knots, with seas of 2 – 4 feet, temporally increasing to 5 – 7 feet after 25 June.

SOMALI COAST: The Somali Coastal area remains under the influence of the Southwest Monsoon, with south-southwesterly winds of 25 – 30 knots and seas of 6 – 8 feet. EXTENDED FORECAST: south-southwesterly winds of 25 – 30 knots and seas of 7 – 9 feet.

ARABIAN SEA: Westerly winds of 18 – 24 knots and seas of 9 – 12 feet. EXTENDED FORECAST: West-southwesterly winds of 18 – 24 knots and seas of 9 – 12 feet.

CENTRAL AFRICAN COAST/INDIAN OCEAN: South-southeasterly winds of 18 – 22 knots and seas of 5 – 7 feet. EXTENDED FORECAST: South-southeasterly winds of 12 – 16 knots and seas of 7 – 9 feet, decreasing to between 4 – 6 feet.

MOZAMBIQUE CHANNEL: The normal high and low pressure interaction around 40 degrees South latitude continues to influence the area. Expect south-southeasterly winds in the northern channel of 15 – 18 knots and seas of 5 – 7 feet. In the southern channel, there will be south-southeasterly winds of 12 – 15 knots and seas of 7 – 9 feet. EXTENDED FORECAST: In the northern channel, expect east-southeasterly winds of 10 – 15 knots and seas of 4 – 6 feet. In the southern channel, expect south-southeasterly winds of 8 – 12 knots, becoming variable at 4 – 6 knots, with seas of 5 –7 feet.

SURFACE CURRENTS: The currents within the Gulf of Aden average around 0.5 – 1 knot. Currents speeds along the Somali basin, continuing south off the northern Kenya coastline until about 10˚S will average around 2 – 3 knots. The Mozambique Channel has an average current of 0.25 – 1.25 knots.

The report is brought to you by the U.S. Office of Naval Intelligence’s Maritime OPINTEL Report

Read: Last Week’s Piracy Report


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Tagged with: piracy report

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gCaptain Staff

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Armed Support for Vessels Transiting High Risk Maritime Areas Not a Solution (UK)

Posted on Jun 22nd, 2012 with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , .
Armed Support for Vessels Transiting High Risk Maritime Areas Not a Solution The current focus on armed support for vessels transiting high risk maritime areas in Africa, the Middle East and elsewhere should not become the norm, GAC Solutions’ Christer Sjödoff has told delegates from the shipping and offshore industries who gathered in London to debate long-term, effective ways to tackle the threat of sea crime. Speaking at the ‘Lunch and Learn’ event hosted by GAC Protective Solutions, Sjödoff said that sole reliance on private maritime security companies is not a long-term solution to maritime security threats around the world. GAC Protective Solutions – a strategic partnership between global shipping, logistics and marine services provider GAC and maritime intelligence agency AKE – detailed recent developments in sea crime across East and West Africa. Law firm Stronachs LLP, which provides legal diligence services to banks and equity providers in the oil and gas industry, also delivered an insight into the legal responsibilities and threats of operating in high-risk areas. Sjödoff, GAC’s Group Vice President Solutions, says: “We hosted the Lunch and Learn session to address the longer-term issues and developments of sea crime globally, and to ensure that non-lethal preventative solutions are being seriously discussed. While there is value in providing armed support on some vessels transiting high risk areas, we feel strongly that this approach should not become a widespread industry norm. Rather, we should ensure that owners and operators have access to the latest intelligence regarding current and developing patterns of sea crime, as well as the means to proactively harden their vessels and train all crew members ahead of any voyage, both of which are fundamental to combating sea crimes.” AKE’s Maritime Director, Rick Filon, says: “As an industry, we have rushed to arm ourselves against a violent threat, which is understandable. However, this is neither a proportionate response nor a sustainable long-term solution. Further, the simple presence of arms on board may even lead to an escalation of violence. Whilst we must always remain vigilant, it is clear that effective risk mitigation and the use of preventative solutions provide a global, cost effective and safe solution that is proportionate to the threat of sea crime.” GAC Protective Solutions provides onboard crew training, pre-voyage preparation, defensive configurations including the latest citadel door protection from Intelligent Engineering and remotely-operated water cannon systems from Unifire, and real-time intelligence alerts on global maritime security issues.  
Dieser Eintrag wurde veröffentlicht in Schifffahrt, Aktuelle News, Piraten von g.goettling. Permanenter Link des Eintrags.

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