Maritime Monday for July 9, 2012: The Monster from the Deep By Monkey Fist On July 8, 2012

 
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Web of Evil #20, November 1954 Fantasy Ink see also: O is for Octopus

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St. John, looking towards Carlton, NB, 1870 – Musée McCord Museum

see also: Kamloops on the C.P.R., BC, 1887

Detail of a panoramic view of London by Wenceslaus Hollar, published in 1647

London, an Olympian Among Cities Folger Library Traces London’s Rise

WASHINGTON — The attention London receives this summer is sure to include the kind of glossy public relations usually associated with hosts of the Olympic Games.

But that Olympic veneer has little to do with why we should care about London in the first place, which is why we are lucky the Folger Shakespeare Library here has chosen to add its quiet, studied voice to the season’s festivities with its exhibition “Open City: London, 1500-1700.” We should care, the show suggests, because of a more profound role London has played in world culture by shaping ideas of what a great city can be…

keep reading on the NY Times

Open City: London, 1500-1700” is on view through Sept. 30 at the Folger Shakespeare Library, 201 East Capitol Street SE, Washington; (202) 544-4600 - via fuckyeahcartography -

Interesting Books, Articles and Websites about Binoculars

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Zeppelin! A sailor waving at a friend onboard a Zeppelin, New Jersey 1936

“We All Go Down With The Ship” ~ Watercolor, Gouache, & Ink 12×16 by Derek Nobbs (prints for sale)

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A view of ships in the village harbour. Land of Ice

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Shipping Scene On San Francisco Bay vintage postcard

see also: San Francisco DockSan Francisco Dock 100 years agoWindjammersFireboat “Dennis T. Sullivan”San Francisco’s Water Front“Homeward Bound” – San Francisco

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close shave

…These are from an album I got from a antique shop a few years back. It cost me $5 and was full of photos taken (I assume) by a sailor stationed in the South Seas from 1940-1946…

more from Kelly Vivanco

Hearts of Oak

Bamforth published a huge series of patriotic and sentimental postcards during the Great War. This is just one of several hundred that I found in my Great-Uncle William’s attic. –more

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image: Project Gutenberg’s The Civil War Centennial Handbook, by William H. Price

Gothika –Fantastic Steam and Iron: Gun Accuracy

Gun accuracy, if anything, was even worse than supply. In 1870, HMS Captain, Monarch, and Hercules fired at a ship-sized rock off Vigo, Spain, during a practice run of six minutes at a range of 1,000 yards. It was calculated that, of the twelve rounds that these three ironclads managed to get off (about one every 2.5 minutes, which was about the best rate that a well-trained gun crew of the time could achieve), one would have scored a direct hit and one an indirect hit. Had the target been a moving ship, there was a good likelihood that all of the shells would have missed altogether…

keep reading see also: A History of the Torpedo The Early Days

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Iron-hulled Affondatore transformed into a pre-dreadnought, circa 1892 (more)

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Liebig’s Beef Extract “Warships” Italian issue, 1897 - Original (1802 x 1162) -

see also: New YorkThundererItaliaWorthMaria Theresia

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HMS Flora on the rocks

December 1903 the cruiser HMS Flora ran aground on an Island off the coast of Canada Portsmouth Historic Dockyard

HMS Flora (1893): decommissioned in 1922; HMS Flora was the subject of a famous salvage operation after running aground in 1903. In 1914, just prior to the World War I, the Flora was placed on the sale list and remained on harbour service for the majority of the conflict. In April 1915 Flora was renamed TS Indus II. She was sold on 12 December 1922 and was broken up at Dover.–wiki

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Scaffolding and dock workers; near Milk Market; Newcastle Libraries

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Roode Zee and Zwarte Zee; Dutch Tugs on the Tyne; Newcastle Libraries

“The illustration shows the tugs Roods Zee and the Zwarte Zee taking in tow an enormous floating dock, capable of holding vessels up to 7,000 tons, from Wallsend-on-Tyne to Callao, Peru. To tow so unwieldy a thing as this for any distance at all is a pretty severe tax on a tug ; but to take it all the way to Peru on the west coast of South America is about the utmost test which the most severe critic could ever impose. The distance is 10,260 nautical miles.”

see also: Launch of floating dock ‘Bermuda’

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Fish Quay Festival North Shields; Newcastle Libraries Quays and Docks (Set: 96)

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Ship passing buoy; Boston Public Library, Print Department - Original (1500 x 1169) -

see also: Liner guided into Boston Harbor by tugs (1938) — Big guns on Navy ship, Navy YardNavy ship coming into dry dock at Navy YardSteamer “Portland”

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drawing of Portland by Samuel Ward Stanton; 1890

The Portland is a historic shipwreck in Gloucester, Massachusetts. The S.S. Portland was built by New England Shipbuilding Co. in 1889 and sank in the Portland Gale of 1898 off of Cape Ann, killing 192 people.  more

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Penguins surround the wreck of The Gratitude, 1911

In Antarctica
We’ve seen the fantastic colour photographs of Shackleton’s Endurance in Antarctica, 1915, but they only skim the surface of photographer Frank Hurley’s work in Antarctica. Between 1911 and 1932 he visited the continent six times, accumulating stunning captures of landscapes, people, animals, and expeditions. Today, a selection….
Shipwrecks on Macquarie Island:
Macquarie Island has more than its share of shipwrecks. The first was recorded in the first official report of the island, in the Sydney Gazette of 18 August 1820, which read …Captain Smith saw several pieces of wreck of a large vessel on this island, apparently very old and high up in the grass, probably the remains of the ship of the unfortunate de la Perouse…”

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HMAS Australia launching aircraft 1918

A Sopwith 1 1/2 Strutter biplane aircraft taking off from a platform built on top of HMAS Australia‘s midships “Q” turret. more

Australia’s ship’s company had consistently suffered from low morale since the battlecruiser entered service, and the proportion of Australia’s sailors who were placed on disciplinary charges during World War I was among the highest in the RAN. Factors which contributed to low morale and poor discipline included frustration at not participating in the Battle of Jutland, high rates of illness, limited opportunities for leave, delays or complete lack of deferred pay, and poor-quality food. There was also the perception that Australia’s British personnel were being promoted faster than their Australian counterparts and were dominating leadership positions.

Representatives of the ship’s company approached Captain Claude Cumberlege to ask for a one-day delay on departure; this would allow the sailors to have a full weekend of leave, give Perth-born personnel the chance to visit their families, and give personnel another chance to invite people aboard.  Cumberlege replied that as Australia had a tight schedule of “welcome home” port visits, such delays could not even be considered.  The next morning, at around 10:30, between 80 and 100 sailors gathered in front of ‘P’ turret. Australia was ready to depart, but when the order to release the mooring lines and get underway was given, Cumberlege was informed that the stokers had abandoned the boiler rooms.

After the assembly on deck, some sailors had masked themselves with black handkerchiefs, and encouraged or intimidated the stokers on duty into leaving their posts, leaving the navy’s flagship stranded at the buoy, in full view of dignitaries and crowds lining the nearby wharf. Naval historians disagree on what happened next…

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Captain A.A. Bestic: Kicking the Canvas

A Tremendous Story of Sea Adventure – back Pan Books 1960

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Master Shipwright Peter Pett and the Sovereign of the Seas Painting by Peter Lely, 1637

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Thames Barrier / HMS Bulwark / (Original 1800 x 1200)

imageHMS Bulwark is an Albion-class landing platform dock, the UK’s newest class of amphibious assault warship and built in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria. Numerous delays caused the delivery date to be put back, with the ship entering service in December 2004. In October 2011 she became the Flagship of the Royal Navy.

The ship is designed to send large numbers of troops and vehicles to shore as quickly as possible. The rear of the Bulwark opens and floods a compartment, allowing the boats inside to be launched.

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HMS Bulwark (1899)

Following the outbreak of the First World War, Bulwark, along with the rest of the squadron was attached to the Channel Fleet, conducting patrols in the English Channel. On 26 November 1914, while anchored near Sheerness, she was destroyed by a large internal explosion for the loss of 736 men. Two of the 14 survivors died later in hospital. The explosion was likely to have been caused by the overheating of cordite charges that had been placed adjacent a boiler room bulkhead.

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HMS Bulwark (1860) was previously the planned 110-gun first rate HMS Howe. Already obsolete when launched, she was never fitted with all her guns and was renamed Bulwark in 1885 when she became a training ship. She was renamed HMS Impregnable in 1886, and then HMS Bulwark again in 1919. She was sold for breaking up in 1921.

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The Art of Japanese Manhole Covers

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Sand Pebbles, art by Cold is the Sea

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Lashing on new ratlines in the rigging aboard the Frances and Marion, a Portuguese trawler.

Provincetown, Massachusetts, 1942 / John Collier Jr. via fuckyeahmassachusetts

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Özlem Shipwreck; A shipwreck named Desire at the shore of Batumi

The Turkish tanker ran ashore near the Black Sea port, and has remained in the exact spot where it “sank,” half-crippled, during the ensuing years. Broken in the center, the tanker’s middle part sank into the murky water, leaving its ends to jut out of the water — a colorful tragedy that attracts an ever-growing number of curiosity seekers.

see also: Treasure Island Naval History Mural

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The Yellow Jack – Radnage St Mary Church, Buckinghamshire (more)

- Original (3548 x 3256) -

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video: TITANIC BELFAST l’exposition ouverte à Belfast en mars 2012 a virtual walk-through of the ship, ascending deck by deck (4 mins)

see also: Superbes maquettes du RMS TITANIC

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Streamlined Soviet Passenger Hydrofoils

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above: Specimen: Juvenile live bay scallop Argopecten irradians. The ultimate goal of this research is to help restore scallop populations in Rhode Island below: Specimen: Live coral Goniastrea sp., known as green brain coral. One full polyp in the center is shown with four surrounding polyps. Walled corallites are purple. Technique: Phase contrast illumination. (James H. Nicholson/NOAA

Extraordinary Microscope Photographs on The Big Picture

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dezeen: French architect Jacques Rougerie has designed a cross between a skyscraper and a boat for exploring the unchartered territories of the earth’s oceans…

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in the year 2000 posted by x-ray delta one

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(left)  1940 … super battleship! (right) posted by x-ray delta one

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left: BANG Agente 000 #26 Ferma (Barcelona) – 1970 right: Pocket Books No. 193 – Journey Into Fear by Eric Ambler, 1943

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End of Our Florida Vacation – 1952

Monkey Fist is a smack-talking, potty mouthed, Yankee hating, Red Sox fan in Baltimore, Maryland. In addition to compiling Maritime Monday, she blogs about nautical art, history, and marine science on Adventures of the Blackgang. (twitter) Submit story ideas, news links, photographs, or items of interest to her at MM@gcaptain.com. She can also out-belch any man.

via fuckyeahmassachusetts (click image for source)


Related Articles:
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  2. Maritime Monday for April 16, 2012: Asleep in the Deep
  3. Maritime Monday; week ending July 31, 2011
  4. Maritime Monday; week ending July 24, 2011
  5. Maritime Monday; week ending July 10, 2011
 
About The Author

Monkey Fist

Monkey Fist is a smack-talking, potty mouthed, Yankee hating, Red Sox fan in Portland, Maine.  In addition to compiling Maritime Monday, she blogs about nautical art, history, and marine science on Adventures of the Blackgang. Submit story ideas, news links, photographs, or items of interest to her at MM@gcaptain.com.
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1953 das Licht der Welt in Stuttgart erblickt bis 1962 Stuttgart ab 1963 bis 1970 Bayerrn ( genauer Mittelfranken Lauf/Peg.) Schule ab 1970 Norden Lehrjahre sind keine Herrenjahre Matrose HAPAG 1976 AK 19 86 AM FHSR ( heute STW 95 unbeschränkt) 1992 -1997 Staukoordinator Abteilungleiter Reedereien Rheintainer Transglobe 1997 - Schleusenmeister, den es immer noch seefahrtsmässig in den Finger juckt, wenn er seine Kollegen fahren sieht, inzwischen auch wieder selbst fährt übergangsweise Fähre und ehrenamtlich Dampfschlepper Hamburger Hafen Museumshafen Övelgönne